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Ember spreads a warm new glow on Pudding Lane

Ember

Named in recognition of its location on Pudding Lane in the City where The Great Fire of London started, Ember London is a dazzling new sophisticated restaurant and bar offering pan Asian cuisine within a luxurious, warm and inviting multi-space environment.

Everything in Ember London whispers quality from the surroundings to the coffee, the cutlery and the cuisine. In-house chefs have created their own delicious menus and together with an extensive wine and sake list, the creation of Head Wine & Sake Sommelier Jean-Louis, and stunning signature cocktails Ember London is sizzling with innovative flavours.

The venue was designed by Ross McNally, founder of Scarinish Studio; main contractors for the fit out were DG professional Interiors, who won praise for their work.

The space, which is on lower ground level, was previously occupied by a restaurant, but had been empty for some time and had suffered from considerable water damage, the works therefore began with a comprehensive strip out and considerable remediation.

The interior is divided into a number of different elements, including a main bar and dining area, a cocktail mixology room known as The Cellar Bar and three smaller private dining rooms – The Snug, The Vaults and The Retreat.

Ross McNally said: “The entrance lobby is at ground floor level and includes a subtle reference to the Great Fire through the use of bespoke charred timber cladding on an iconic feature wall.

“The main restaurant bar downstairs combines classic timeless elegance with a slightly industrial influence.  Plush leather deep fluted banquette seating adds a touch of luxurious comfort, contrasting with muted palette of raw materials including Cor-Ten steel, concrete, and plaster walls. The use of a colour palette with an emphasis on dark shades helps create a warm, intimate atmosphere.

“Mood lighting includes copper pendants and table tops are in dark timber. Another striking feature of the lighting are the bespoke polished stainless steel table lamps made from vintage bar headlights.”

The design also includes many other bespoke items such as the Cor-Ten steel bar front which is back-lit and features a repeating pattern of the monogram of the Ember logo. Another striking feature of the bar is the series of bespoke mesh fronted drinks display cabinets along one wall.

Flooring is in timber effect porcelain tiling (both a beautiful and practical choice, given the previous problems with water ingress).

Ross McNally said: “Another striking feature are the almost monolithic-looking steel supporting columns within the main bar restaurant space, which were previously covered in thick layers of paint that we sand blasted back to reveal the shiny steel finish underneath.”

Leading off from the main restaurant bar, The Cellar Bar has a much more laid-back lounge type high-end feel with low seating including banquettes and armchairs and lots of timber finishes including cabinets displaying high end whiskies, marble-topped tables and two feature fluted glass chandeliers. The intimate atmosphere is further enhanced by the timber clad walls and the installation of a slatted timber ceiling which is stained in a dark ebony shade.

Accessed from The Cellar Bar, The Vault is a private cocktail space featuring low pendant lighting and a bespoke elm coffee table made by Scottish craftsman Neil McKinlay of Caleb and Taylor.

Two further new spaces for private parties – The Snug and The Vaults – are accessed from the main bar.

The Snug has been designed featuring ‘supper club’ style booths designed to encourage relaxation and antique style smoked mirrors.

The Retreat includes a floor to ceiling height glass fronted wine cabinet and a barstool-height bespoke table top made from six-year aged elm, again by Neil McKinlay.

A further key element of the project included the complete replacement of the old kitchen with a brand new state of the art stainless steel version.

Ross McNally said: “The creation of all the different internal spaces is geared to encouraging customers to have a different experience each time they visit the venue.”

“DG Professional Interiors did a great job and feedback from the client indicates that the venue is doing really well and he is very happy with the result of the project. It was also important for us as a company to work on a project of this stature.”

Ember

Moleta Munro

Moleta Munro is a contemporary furniture and lighting specialist, focusing on the source and supply of high-end contemporary European designer furniture and lighting; the provision of lighting consultancy solutions; and the management of all associated delivery and installations. The family-run business works with a wide spectrum of brands and this year celebrates its tenth year in the industry.

Moleta Munro focuses specifically on projects within the hospitality sector and over the past decade has worked on a range of prestigious schemes including the refurbishment of conference suites at Novotel Les Halles (Paris); the refurbishment of bedrooms, the foyer and bar at the G&V Hotel Edinburgh; and the refurbishment of the foyer at Adagio Aparthotel Edinburgh. Most recently, Moleta Munro has been involved in the work at Ember London.

Working on Ember London, Moleta Munro helped Scarinish Studio arrive at a comprehensive specification for loose furniture and decorative lighting. Moleta Munro also liaised directly with the end client to supply and manage all the deliveries to site.

Justin Baddon, Moleta Munro, said:

“Although we specify and supply products to London on a regular basis, this is one of the first projects where we have supplied such a comprehensive furnishing package to the capital. The fact that the project is such a prestigious city based establishment is a bonus. It helps establish our growing reach.”

Justin added:

“We pride ourselves on having a creative flair for design and a highly skilled and professional approach to projects. We also try and champion new and innovative products to ensure our clients are always ahead of the curve.”

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